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Halliwell Sutcliffe, the Yorkshire novelist, on Dr John Dunn.

Halliwell Sutcliffe: additional information*

The family home at the time of his birth was Lees Farm Manor House on Haworth Road near Cross Roads on the outskirts of Haworth, and this is where he spent the first three years of his life.

A blue plaque in celebration of Sutcliffe’s years at Lees Farm Manor House was unveiled on Saturday, 13th November 2021 by the Lees cum Cross Roads Village Association (Keighley News 4th November 2021).

Halliwell Sutcliffe would have had only the vaguest of memories about this low beamed old manor house, with its pre-Reformation connections to Rievaulx Abbey, Nostell Priory and the Knights Hospitallers, and thereby very likely to the Templars. However, he spent the greater part of his life within a few miles of the home to his earliest childhood, and would have known something of its history from his parents. His self-perception of rootedness in this place might well have fostered the romanticised historicity that pervaded his novels and many aspects of his life.

Halliwell was the son of John Sutcliffe (b.1835), the local schoolmaster, and in 1873, aged three, moved with the family to the Old School House, on Old Main Street, by the church at Bingley on his father’s appointment as headmaster of Bingley Grammar School. The father held this post until his retirement in 1901 and his son was educated at this school.

*Information building towards a new Halliwell Sutcliffe Blog.


Halliwell Sutcliffe was born in Thackley near Bradford on the 25th of April 1870 at the house of a relative, and died in Linton-in-Craven in 1832. He was an author of popular novels. Most of then are historical romances set in the Yorkshire Dales and the moors around Haworth, and many of them romanticise the Stuarts, especially Bonnie Prince Charlie.

© John Dunn.


From the archive: Imagine

Evola and right thinking Evola and right thinking
Freedom is a kind of transcendence. The higher self should transcend the lower self and the state should encourage this impulse. This is the transcendence that results from a rising up out of the vegetative ‘One life’.
John Dunn

Just a thought: Kant rejected the blind acceptance of the all-consuming presupposition and the consequent theory of truth, i.e. that our ideas, if true, must conform to the presupposed reality. He proposed the revolutionary thesis that objective reality, to be known at all, needs the active involvement of the human mind. Thinking ceases to be passive, a ‘subjective act’, but is instead a ‘constitutive act’ of the very being of the object.
 John Dunn (Child of Encounter)

The Oxford to Cambridge Arc 3 The Oxford to Cambridge Arc 3
Further additions to the project, starting with the Buckingham to Newport Pagnell leg of Ogilby's 1675 Oxford to Cambridge route.
John Dunn

 

England idyll on Dr John Dunn. Motorcycle England
YouTube Channel

In search of the historical, quirky and unusual features of the English countryside as seen from the saddle.

Join me as I follow maps, park up and take a look around. CLICK HERE

“Seeking out historical places of interest has given me wonderful motorcycling opportunities over the years… roads and little lanes, through a variety of landscapes that bear the scars, marks and imprints of those that have trodden, worked and fought on the land before us.”

“Any excursion, whether it be by motorcycle, car, bicycle or on foot, is always better for having an object, or goal in mind. I could take no pleasure in riding around just for the sake of it. There has to be a mission.”

“I ride my motorcycle to seek out things ancient, quirky and monumental, taking in the views, and ‘reading’ the landscape,its geology and history, as I do so.”

Original commentary to all videos researched, written and read by John Dunn.


© John Dunn.

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